John-Kenyon Cataract Center

Have you noticed driving at night is more difficult than it used to be?  Is the glare from headlights or the bright sun blocking your vision?  Do you need additional light to read a book or the newspaper? Have you noticed that once vibrant colors are now dull?

These are all signs that you may be developing or have cataracts.  A cataract is the clouding of the normally clear lens in your eye. Though cataracts are painless, they blur your vision by restricting the amount of light that enters your eye. In addition to hazy vision, symptoms include unusual glare, poor night vision, and changes in the perception of color.

Cataracts are the leading cause of vision loss in adults.  They can occur at any age but are much more common after the age of 55. The good news is there are a wide variety of treatment options available that can not only remove the cataract, but can also improve your vision. Cataract surgery is the most common surgery in the United States, with more than two million procedures performed each year.

A senior female and a boy in the snow

John-Kenyon Cataract Center provides patients with experienced care coupled with the latest technology. Our doctors will evaluate your eyes and determine the best treatment options available for you. Many of our cataract patients are thrilled to learn about Lifestyle Lenses, which can improve your quality of vision and reduce the annoying vision issues that plague cataract patients. What’s even better is learning that cataract surgery is an outpatient procedure that allows you to rest comfortably at home following treatment.

Because your vision is so important, we understand you may have questions about cataracts, the treatment options available to you, and our team of doctors. We hope you find the answers you are looking for here but if you have any additional questions about cataract surgery, do not hesitate to call us at 1.800.DIAL.EYE (1.800.342.5393).

  • Who is at risk for cataracts?

    Cataracts can occur at any age, but are much more common after the age of 55.  About half of the population has a cataract by age 65, and nearly everyone over 75 has them. In rare cases, infants can have congenital cataracts.

  • What causes cataracts?

    Eye injury, medications, and eye diseases can cause cataracts, or they may be congenital.  Although the majority occur as a part of the aging process, other medical factors like diabetes, glaucoma, smoking, and excessive sun exposure can increase the risk of cataract formation.

  • Does insurance cover cataract surgery?

    Medicare and most health insurance plans will cover cataract surgery and monofocal intraocular lenses, but not the cost of premium intraocular lenses.

  • Is there an additional cost for lifestyle lenses?

    Yes.  If you have vision loss due to cataracts, traditional cataract surgery may be covered by Medicare or private insurance. However, the cost of the vision correction technology is considered elective and not covered by Medicare and private insurance.

  • What if I've already had LASIK?

    If you’ve previously had another eye surgery, like LASIK, you may still be a good candidate for cataract surgery.  Your doctor will take previous procedures into consideration when discussing treatment options with you at your comprehensive evaluation.

  • Will I still need glasses after surgery?

    The implantation of lifestyle lenses can provide options to reduce or eliminate your dependence on glasses or contact lenses. Some patients may still need glasses for night driving, reading in low-light, or reading fine print.

Hear from Our Patients


Stephanie K., LASIK

Stephanie’s dry eyes led her to take the plunge and get LASIK at John-Kenyon!

Hear from Our Patients


Catie K., LASIK

The morning after having LASIK at John-Kenyon, Catie told Dr. Piracha she should have had the procedure a long time ago. Not even 24 hours later, she was pointing out all the street signs on the way to her follow up appointment.

Hear from Our Patients


Greg W., LASIK

Greg woke up seeing the alarm clock for the first time in 15 years after LASIK at John-Kenyon.